What's Cool In Road Cycling

Readers Write: SFGP, Konyshev, Worst Rides And More!

SFGP CLARIFIED
I enjoyed reading your recent article on Dan Osipow from Tailwind Sports. It is always a good read when it is promoting the sport of cycling!

We wanted to set the record straight by making your readers aware that the San Francisco Grand Prix presented by BMC Software is an event partnership between Threshold Sports and Tailwind Sports through a jointly owned entity San Francisco Cycling LLC. A major part of the success is due to the event production and marketing experience of Threshold Sports (producers of the high profile major events in the US – Wachovia USPRO Championship, NYC Cycling Championship and Pro Cycling Tour along with the SF race).

As a collaborative effort, Threshold Sports is involved in all aspects of the event and has been highly instrumental in the course design, operations, athlete recruitment and overall marketing of the San Francisco Grand Prix presented by BMC Software. We enjoy and are committed to the collaboration between Threshold and Tailwind, as the two premier pro cycling organizations in the nation. We strongly respect Tailwind Sports and our partnership with them and know that this event would not be a success without both parties and their individual talents.

Jennifer Roccia Moreau
Threshold Sports

KONYSHEV FAN SUPPORT
From the Thursday, Jan 20 “Italian Shorts”
“Autograph Note: I once had the chance to ask ol’ Dimitri for a autograph – at his team hotel after a stage of the ’94 Giro. I stumbled my request in broken
Italian, but he seemed to understand as I handed him my pen and a team poster. He signed it without saying a word, and handed back the poster and pen without
so much as a smile, nod, or anything… maybe he had a bad day, or just didn’t like signing autographs…? – RP”

Now c’mon, every knowledgeable fan of bike racing knows the best time to get autographs and anything resembling a human response is at the team hotel in the morning or at the Village Depart. Only a neo would try for autographs at the end of a grueling Giro stage and then complain that the rider who just got off
the saddle after busting his butt for six hours didn’t smile at him!

I enjoy the site, keep up the good work –

Tony Szurly
New Jersey USA

THE DEVILS ADVOCATE
I am really pissed off at that mentality of people, making excuses for cheating. Cheaters are cheaters be it in school, or on your spouse or in sport. There has never been and never will be a good reason to cheat. Sure you can gain something for the moment but at what cost as everyone loses when you cheat. The people who actually worked, the people holding the event, the families, the spectators…everyone loses! If a father, businessman or a town has to resort to cheating, what are you saying about yourselves? You will get caught, be it by a team mate, the officials or your conscience. There is nothing better in life than doing something the old fashioned way, thru hard work, commitment and perserverence. To all those cheaters out there, get your head out of your ass and give a little hard work a try, you will relish a real effort more than a hollow victory.

Rob MacNeil
Canada

WORST RIDE
Paulo Bettini jumping out of the pack to join Stephano Garzelli in Liege-B-L. Garzelli had done the lion-share of the work in the race, plus he had broken the group and got clear on a climb. Bettini should have played the good teammate, which would have given Mapei
a good chance of finishing one-two (because Bettini
is absolved from working as Garzelli is in front) and
a sure win should Garzelli’s breakaway fail. The fact
that Bettini was the team leader is irrelevant. He could
have cost his team the classic. Johan Museeuw
found himself in a similar situation in 2001 Paris
Roubaix. He was team leader, but he played the
good teammate as Servais Knaven broke clear and
had to settle for second (allowing Domo to finish 1-2-3-5!).

Gives you a different perspective on the Bartoli/Bettini
feud. Selfish, selfish riding.

J.S. Brown

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