What's Cool In Road Cycling
book review

PEZ Bookshelf: The Midlife Cyclist

Carefully working my way through Phil Cavell's “The Midlife Cyclist” for some weeks now, a remarkable book of startling scope, whenever I mention the title it causes people to smile or laugh indulgently. But “The Midlife Cyclist” is actually a thought-provoking exploration of something that has never before existed: a great cohort of middle-aged athletes rewriting our knowledge of human health and performance.

PEZ Bookshelf: Chasing the Rainbow

There is a very special jersey that, once you win it at a one day event, it is yours for a year wherever you race. This jersey, is of course, the glorious rainbow-striped confection first donned by Alfredo Binda in 1927. Its fascinating history is the subject of “Chasing the Rainbow: The Story of Road Cycling's World Championships” by Giles Belbin.

PEZ Bookshelf: Eat Bike Cook

It is said that there are people who live to eat and others who eat to live and for some of us enough cycling means we can eat whatever we want. “Eat Bike Cook” is a wonderful little book that really is about the joys of riding and the pleasures of eating, with an original viewpoint.

PEZ Bookshelf: Mapping Le Tour!

Book Review: As the 2021 Tour winds up the second week, Leslie Reissner takes a trip down Memory Lane and journeys the Tour de France routes of the past. Mapping le Tour by Ellis Bacon maps the journey taken from the first Tour to the 2014 Tour when the French race hit the roads of Yorkshire.

PEZ Bookshelf: A Cyclist’s Guide to the Pyrenees

The Pyrenees have often served as a dramatic battlefield for the Tour de France and, starting on July 10, the final week of the 2021 edition will see five stages in these mountains. For cycling enthusiasts the Pyrenees experience is a must-do, and a new book by Peter Cossins provides an insider's look at some great riding.

PEZ Bookshelf: 48 Days

Bike racing in 2020 was very strange, things like races with no spectators and Spring Classics in autumn, but the weirdest is the overlapping of the Giro's final week with the Vuelta's first. But in 1981 only three days separated the two races and Giovanni Battaglin, in the new book “48 Days,” tells the astonishing story of how he won both.