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obituary

British Pro Star of the 60’s and 70’s – Jim Moore

British ex-pro Jim Moore who emigrated to Canada in 1974; he enjoyed a long and varied career - from amateur road and track man in the UK to ‘independent’ in France, representing GB in the 1964 Tour de l’Avenir, a ride in the Skol Six Day, a successful pro career in the UK before crossing the Atlantic.

Rest In Peace Chris Anker Sørensen

It was ironic that Chris Anker Sørensen’s life should end doing what he had become known for after his career as a professional cyclist was over – preparing meticulously for his role as a TV race commentator, out riding the parcours of Sunday’s World Individual Time Trial Championship in Flanders.

Goodbye Poland’s Best: Ryszard Szurkowski

On Monday we learned of the passing of Poland's top bike rider, Ryszard Szurkowski. The man from Lower Silesia came to prominence before the fall of the Iron-Curtain, but in those days the Russians and East Germans made life hard for everyone. Ed Hood remembers Poland's best.

Goodbye Champion: Grant Thomas Tribute

It was with much sadness that PEZ learned of the recent death of former British Amateur Road Race Champion, Grant Thomas. His ‘Golden Era’ was the 70’s and whilst he’s perhaps best remembered for winning the Championship, his greatest triumphs came in The Netherlands – on road and track.

Ron Webb – RIP

Obituary: It was with sadness that we learned of the death of Mr. Ron Webb, professional bike rider, father of the modern six day format and track builder of renown. My friend, Phillip, ‘Pip’ Taylor has written a comprehensive and eloquent tribute which we reproduce below.

Rest in Peace Raymond ‘Poupou’ Poulidor

Obituary: The sad news of the death of Raymond Poulidor was announced first by the sportspaper, L'Equipe last Wednesday and the French public went into mourning, as did the cycling World. Poulidor didn't have the palmarès he deserved, but more importantly he was loved by the public. Ed Hood looks at his career and life.

Tony Hoar R.I.P. With Much Respect

Tony Hoar, Britain’s second Tour de France finisher and famously, ‘lanterne rouge’ in the 1955 Tour de France has died in his adopted home of Canada, aged 87 years. Obituary by Ed Hood.